Log Post: What Goes on Underwater

“There’s nothing wrong with enjoying looking at the surface of the ocean itself, except that when you finally see what goes on underwater, you realize that you’ve been missing the whole point of the ocean. Staying on the surface all the time is like going to the circus and staring at the outside of the … Continued

Log Post: The Wild West

It has taken Principal Investigator Dr. Barbara Block and her team three years to plan this voyage; she has been thinking about it for more than a decade. Now over a thousand nautical miles away from her hometown in Monterey, California, she ventures into an Oceanic Wild West seeking to deepen her understanding of white … Continued

Publication: Garvin, J., Slayback, D., Ferrini, V., Frawley, J., Giguere, C., Asrar, G., and Anderson, K. (2018). Monitoring and Modeling the Rapid Evolution of Earth’s Newest Volcanic Island: Hunga Tonga Hunga Ha’apai (Tonga) Using High Spatial Resolution Satellite Observations. Geophysical Research Letters, 45, doi: 10.1002/2017GL076621. [This article has been published as Open Access].

Garvin, J., Slayback, D., Ferrini, V., Frawley, J., Giguere, C., Asrar, G., and Anderson, K. (2018). Monitoring and Modeling the Rapid Evolution of Earth’s Newest Volcanic Island: Hunga Tonga Hunga Ha’apai (Tonga) Using High Spatial Resolution Satellite Observations. Geophysical Research Letters, 45, doi: 10.1002/2017GL076621. [This article has been published as Open Access].

Log Post: A Greater Understanding

What is there left to say? The blogs that have been written about this cruise cover the breadth and depth of this amazing expedition. If you are like me and you start at the end of the expedition, working your way backwards, then I recommend you read them all. Get inspired. Look at the beautiful photos. Learn … Continued

Log Post: Technology, Courage, and Next Steps

Now that I have recovered from lack of sleep, two weeks of intense sampling, and can feel the stable earth under my feet, I would like to share a special morning off the west coast of O‘ahu. Our first morning onboard the Falkor, I was able to watch the Waianae Valley illuminate with the rising … Continued

Log Post: Wrapping Up the #MicrobeEddyBots Expedition ~ Week 04 Video

“Whenever you are able to achieve something that you couldn’t before, it always gives you hope for the future.” More than a decade went into the development of the #MicrobeEddyBots, but now they are able gather data in a manner and detail never-before seen. “It is this type of long term investment that I think … Continued

Log Post: An Ocean’s Breath

There are only a few places in the ocean where the dynamics of the microbial organisms are so tightly coupled that they give rise to perfect synchronicity. The North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (NPSG) that we are sailing through for this research cruise is one of these special places. In this ecosystem, light is one of … Continued

Log Post: How To Spy On Nitrogen-Fixing Bacteria

As we sail through the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (NPSG), we are surrounded by clear, blue water. Sunlight can penetrate beyond 100 meters in this part of the ocean, so the microscopic phytoplankton that make up the base of the food web have plenty of light for photosynthesis. What they do not have enough of … Continued

Log Post: Pumping Iron

When I am out at sea and have just finished a long day of collecting seawater samples, my favorite comfort food is a big bowl of cereal. Among other things, my cereal box advises me to eat 8 mg of iron each day. Do not worry, I am assured: 100% of that iron can be … Continued

Log Post: Can’t Stop Moving

I really can’t stop moving. There are two reasons for this. One is that I am on a ship. The other is that I am on a ship. Yes, these are distinct reasons. First, life as a scientist on a research vessel is busy. I am running (or rather walking briskly; we do not run … Continued